The serious business of eating.

Some pictures of the food from our last charter, taken by the captain. No hilarious anecdotes i’m afraid, just the serious business of food.

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This is a re-invention of a classic dish of ham ‘n’eggs that you will find in every greasy spoon cafe across the UK. Here I have turned it into a nice little starter. The ham is actually ham hock that i have slow cooked for a few hours in stock until it is falling off the bone. I am a big fan of showcasing cheaper cuts of meat that people don’t come across every day. Its great fun as a chef to take a cheap cut of meat like shin, cheek, offal or belly and turn it into a dish that the guests enjoy probably more than they would the fillet steak and foie gras. I pulled the meat of the bone, removing the fat and then shredded it by hand. I made a reduction using my basic jus, reduced with some freshly squeezed apple juice and then mixed some of this with some grainy mustard and the meat. Then this is rolled up into a big long sausage in cling film and refrigerated until it sets. Then just cut into portions and reheated in the oven. I have served it here with a pea puree, fried quail’s egg and some hollandaise. This is also a great brunch dish. Porkalicious!

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Next up is a very simple dish of Chilean sea bass with Asian greens, soba noodles and dashi broth.

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Another starter that i did while it was still asparagus season. Asparagus three ways, thinly sliced and raw marinated in white truffle oil, roasted asparagus and asparagus puree. All served with an amazing Iberico ham and some soft boiled quail’s eggs.

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And me, plating it up on the only surface available, the chest freezer.

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This dish is a real pain in the arse to plate up without another pair of hands. I am always stressing about the food going cold, as much as i would like to take it a bit slower and ensure that the dish looks perfect, i am forced to get it on the plate asap. Bigger boat please, with a sous chef and hot lamps. It is a duo of beef, the fillet and the shin (cooked in a similar way to the ham hock) served with dauphinoise gratin, roast vegetables and some squash puree.

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Man i look tired! Notice how the photographer makes the food look fairly tasty, but i look like shit. C’est la vie.

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I will be the first to admit that desserts are not my forte but i am getting better and especially enjoy garnishing them. The thing i do like about a lot of the desserts is that they can be made well in advance and so they only require pulling out of the fridge and finishing off. This is about the simplest dessert i do on the yacht. A chocolate and whiskey mousse. Very straight forward and always goes down well.

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I also have to do lunch for the guests which usually comprises of a buffet of several dishes that they help themselves to or that are silver served or maybe put on the table family style. Here one of the guests wanted cold dressed lobster so we had to track down a local fisherman and he then went out at 4 in the morning to catch a bunch of lobsters. At 7am he was at the back of the yacht in his little row boat with a hessian sack full of angry crustacia ready to be turned into lunch by me. The guests also wanted some salmon so i finally had the opportunity to do a whole dressed salmon which i have only ever done before at catering college 20 years ago. It is a very ‘Mrs.Beeton’ 70’s dish. Still tasty though.

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And finally, i have to feed the crew. So an example of crew lunch would be some sushi, sashimi and Vietnamese rolls. Godda keep the crew happy!!

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As if i don’t feed the crew and they get too hungry, this kind of thing happens.

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It’s a chocolate fountain by the way.

TTFN

achefabroad

 

 

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